All About World Mental Health Day

father and son

Remind Someone They’re So Loved By Sending Them a Care Package

This year’s World Mental Health Day is observed October 10, 2020, and it’s more important than ever, considering the current state of our world.

What is World Mental Health Day?

The World Health Organization hosts World Mental Health Day each year to raise awareness of mental health issues around the world. Making mental health care available for people worldwide is an important step for improving overall health.

Why is World Mental Health Day So Important?

Mental health care is important for everyone, but this year is different. With all our lives drastically changed as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, this year has been challenging: social distancing and isolation with friends and family members; major changes to our education systems; and risk of exposure to potentially deadly contagions during the course of normally low-risk work.

WHO also cites the “economic consequences of the pandemic,” which are “already being felt, as companies let staff go in an effort to save their business, or indeed shut down completely.”

In any normal emergent situation, the need for mental health support increases. Today, investing in mental health programs is more important now than ever. This year’s World Mental Health Day goal is to help increase investment in accessible mental health services around the globe.

How Can I Help Someone with Their Mental Health?

Although World Mental Health Day has a more global approach, it’s important to know how you can help a loved one, should they be struggling with their mental health. Here are a few tips you may find helpful.

  • Watch for suicide warning signs: your loved one makes statments about suicide, withdrawal from social contact, suffer from severe mood swings, partcipate in risky behaviors, express feelings of hopelessness, begin to give away their belongings, and change their normal routine.
  • Be direct when asking your loved one if they’re contemplating suicide. It will not push them toward taking action. Ask questions like, “Are you thinking about hurting yourself?” or “Are you thinking about suicide?”
  • Offer to sit with them while they call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255, or to drive them to an appointment with a psychiatrist, therapist, or other mental health professional.
  • Don’t be afraid to call 911 if your loved one is in imminent danger.
  • Remind them that they’re so loved, and that you’re there for them when they need you. You can do this by simply sending a text or making a phone call, dropping off a meal to the porch, or sending them a care package full of snacks and microwaveable meals for when they just don’t feel up to cooking.